PaddleWise Discussion on Transportable Stoves




Date: Wed, 06 Jan 1999 20:30:00 -0000
From: "Mel Grindol" 
Subject: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves

Some time ago there was a discussion about transporting stoves on airlines.  The conclusion being that most traditional backpackers stoves are not allowed on commercial airplanes for safety reasons.  (Thank god Kaczensky (sp?) didn't have a modern stove.)

A couple of stoves were mentioned as possible alternatives.  Well, today I was flipping through a catalog my wife borrowed from a co-worker (thanks Julie).  They have a little stove designed to burn twigs that is cheap.  Check it out at :

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/

and search on "Pocket Cooker" to get a picture and description.  (it should be the 8th item in the search results list)  Very small and it's hard to go wrong for $10. :)

They also have an Alcohol Stove that, IIRC, should be able to be taken on an airplane.

Mel
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Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 23:29:13 EST From: Bluecanoe2@aol.com Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves In a message dated 1/6/1999 4:56:08 PM EST, grindol@my-dejanews.com writes: << They also have an Alcohol Stove that, IIRC, should be able to be taken on an airplane. Nope! Can't do it even an alcohol stove! There are three wood burning ones actually. Two of them have fans to blow air in by Sierra. a big one adna small one. Then there is a flat folding one that depends on a draft to suck in air. It folds up pretty flat. For those of us who like to cook on wood fires, they are pretty neat. Butn about anything, pine cones included. John
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 08:07:20 -0800 From: "John C. Winskill" Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] FW: Transportable stoves I own the Pocket Cooker (as well as a couple of sizes of the Zip Stove; description following): A far superior stove which burns twigs, pinecones etc is the Zip Stove. It is more expensive (in one form it comes nestled in its own pot/cook kit and bag) but is far more efficient and self contained. The stove does require one AA battery to operated. The battery drives a small fan which is somewhat adjustable and the firebox then becomes a small blast furnace. The stove is also very light. John Winskill
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 11:33:16 -0600 (CST) From: "Robert C. Cline" Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves Isn't it the fuel that is not allowed, rather than the stove? Robert Mel wrote: >Some time ago there was a discussion about transporting stoves on >airlines. The conclusion being that most traditional backpackers stoves >are not allowed on commercial airplanes for safety reasons.
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 11:27:42 -0800 From: skerries@hotmail.com Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves At 11:33 AM 1/7/99 -0600, you wrote: >Isn't it the fuel that is not allowed, rather than the stove? > Robert > In a word, no. Government regulations (not airline policies) forbid carrying not only the fuels, but any stoves or fuel bottles that have EVER contained fuel (Sorry for the "shouting" - just have to stress this.) This is the case in Canada at least, and since we mostly take our cues from the US FAA, I imagine it's true in the States too. I believe the concern is that fuel fumes are actually potentially more dangerous than liquid fuel. Hope this helps. Cheers, Philip T. N4916' W12308' "The opinions expressed in this posting are not necessarily those of my employer, or indeed, of any sentient being."
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 15:45:35 EST From: Bluecanoe Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves In a message dated 1/7/1999 1:11:30 PM EST, rcline writes: << Isn't it the fuel that is not allowed, rather than the stove? Robert >> Nope! The stove too whether new or used or cleaned or anything.Fuel has always been taboo. Now it is the stove too. Wanna know why? The feds raided a place that was building bombs into camping stove fuel tanks. The X-ray machines only picked up the image of the stove and tank, not the inner workings of teh bomb. I uded tobe a police officer, have lots of friends that still are. One showed me the "blotter" as they are called outlining how to recognise them. Frankly, I can live without my stove on board or a mad bombers "stove bomb" on board also. A small price to pay to keep teh plane in the air and not on the ground in pieces. John
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 14:21:59 -0700 (MST) From: Mark Zen Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves On Thu, 7 Jan 1999, Product Information Department wrote: > At 11:33 AM 1/7/99 -0600, you wrote: > >Isn't it the fuel that is not allowed, rather than the stove? > > Robert > > > In a word, no. Government regulations (not airline policies) forbid > carrying not only the fuels, but any stoves or fuel bottles that have EVER > contained fuel (Sorry for the "shouting" - just have to stress this.) This > is the case in Canada at least, and since we mostly take our cues from the > US FAA, I imagine it's true in the States too. I believe the concern is > that fuel fumes are actually potentially more dangerous than liquid fuel. > Hope this helps. > > Cheers, > Philip T. you are correct in your assumption ;-) my conversations w/combat pilots indicated they were most concerned with not coming back with half a tank of gas, or less, the more VAPOR [less liquid] the more explosive... mark #------canoeist[at]netbox[dot]com----http://www.diac.com/~zen/mark ---- # mark zen o, o__ o_/| o_. po box 474 Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 12:22:14 -0700 From: Steve Jernigan Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves Hi All! I had the opportunity to try one of the Pocket Cookers (or a similar item) a couple of years ago. Alas, there is always a good possibility of "operator error", but I never did get it to boil water. (sure got my coffeepot black, tho!) Anyone else on the list ever really USE one? It seemed to be a just the thing for an emergency stove in the trunk, or on a snowmachine, but I just couldn't get enough "HOT!!!" out of it. Just curious. Steve J.
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 19:53:39 -0800 From: rdiaz@ix.netcom.com Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves I reviewed one of these for my newsletter back in 1994. Not the Sierra Stove with battery but rather one that was made in Israel and sold through Gander Mountain for $15.95. I haven't checked but was told by some readers who followed up a year or two later that it no longer was being offered. The stove is/was pyramid shape, totally collapsible to a flat package that would fit in a provided nylon bag. Folded down it was the size of a small book. It has a door on one side. the object is to feed in wood from the side rather than from the top as in the Sierra Stove. This allows you to use more than just twigs. You could get a small branch and feed it in if you liked, but twigs could be also feed in that way. The top had prongs on which a coffee pot would sit and blacken a lot of course. It weighed slightly over a pound. The stated time for boiling 3 cups of water at sea level was 10 minutes. However, using quite dry kindling, I got 3 cups boiling like mad in just 5 minutes and extrapolated that it would do a quart in around 8 minutes certainly. That is not bad compared to the stated 5 to 6 minute for boiling a quart of water on gas stoves such as MSRs. Obviously different wood supply would achieve different results but it most definitely will bring water to boil. I think its shape is what made it work so well, a terrific draft from the sides and bottom and the pyramid sides concentrating all that heat up in a relatively small area where you put the pot. I know that there are other such products floating around. My quest for one was peaked by a woman I knew (the same one with the duct taped neck gasket) who had found one some where in the Adirondaks and regularly boiled water for tea and coffee on it just using twings off the ground. Hers had last a few seasons but was on the verge of burning through the last time I saw it which was quite a few years ago. I liked that it did not require a battery and folded flat. Also that ability to feed sizable branches in from the side and push them in further as they burnt. It looked like something that you could carry along with a small supply of firestarter type wood or the Fire Ribbon stuff in a tube. This way, if you ran into situations where everything was wet at your campsite, you would have enough to see you through with what you brought along. It weigth terms, the stove and the emergency back up fire starter stuff would be just slightly more than the lighest gas stove and fuel. But of course you would and could use what you found along the way and never resort to the backup fuel. ralph - -- - ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Ralph Diaz . . . Folding Kayaker newsletter PO Box 0754, New York, NY 10024 Tel: 212-724-5069; E-mail: rdiaz@ix.netcom.com "Where's your sea kayak?"----"It's in the bag." - ----------------------------------------------------------------------- HR NOSHADE> Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 08:11:13 -0500 From: "Sisler, Clyde" Subject: RE: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves I just bought something called Esbit Pocket Stove for emergency use from Campmor for $9.99 that runs on solid fuel tablets. Haven't tried it yet but the propoganda talks about how it's designed to produce more 'Hot'. http://www.campmor.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ProductDisplay?prmenbr=226&prrfnbr =1055
Date: Fri, 08 Jan 1999 09:17:04 -0700 From: Steve Jernigan Subject: Re: [Paddlewise] Transportable stoves At 07:53 PM 1/7/99 -0800, rdiaz@ix.netcom.com wrote: >The stove is/was pyramid shape, totally collapsible to a flat package >It weighed slightly over a pound. > >Obviously different wood supply would achieve different results but it >most definitely will bring water to boil. > Sounds like the same basic stove. I seem to recall burning my fingers on a hinged door on the side while loading twigs. Might be worth a second look, 'cause it sure would be a handy little item. Thanx everyone for the feedback! S.